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A company that keeps company with organized crime figures may run into roadblocks in some places, but perhaps not in New Jersey.

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Players club casino ventura tournaments It is just-- This would simply be authorizing another type or form of game. The quality of life-- Because of the industry, this tourism industry, the quality of life for the residents has substantially increased. Is there a way where you and ACC can communicate and coordinate a similar program up there, so that we bring the process of education and employment to the people who need it where the labor base is? Marcellus Jackson, the former Passaic council member who pleaded guilty to bribery, quit his job as special assistant to the state education commissioner after Attorney General Gurbir Grewal found it was mike fedorko casino control for Jackson to have been hired in the first place. We need to do this. More than businesses, employing tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of workers, and they all did business with casinos.

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If you go on the Internet right now and decided to gamble, there's no one that can tell you, if you're playing crap, that every tenth roll of the dice is going to be a seven. There's no one that can tell you if all the tens are in the blackjack deck. There's no one that can tell you that every fifth roll will be double zero on the roulette wheel. You don't know if the games are safe or honest. More importantly, you certainly don't know if you win, you're ever going to get paid.

Because again, these are all offshore. Unfortunately, he never got paid, and he sued, and he won. But what did he win? He won the fact that he won the lawsuit, and that should that person, whoever it is who owns that Internet site, ever come into New Jersey or the United States, we'll get him and we'll get you your money. But that's not going to happen. How many kids are hurt? How many people, who cannot control their own gambling problems, are losing, hand over fist, dollars every day.

These are major problems, ladies and gentlemen. The other major problem is people in New Jersey are gambling on the Internet and New Jersey is not getting a penny out of it. However, if you go to Atlantic City and you play on the tables, we'll get some taxes out of that.

So all of these offshores sites have people gambling where a we're not getting any money from them, b we don't know if they're legitimate or safe, and c who owns them? Who owns these sites that are offshore? Has organized crime found a way to do their business legally? I don't know. I'm sure there's an organized crime site somewhere.

Are there just plain guys like you and I who decided to be entrepreneurs and go into business? I'm sure some of that exists, too. But we don't know who they are. They could be Columbian drug dealers for all we know, who own these Internet sites, and we're just helping them to make more money to put more drugs on the street. Well, all of these answers go unknown, but we do know this. We do know this. We do know that there are , , sites.

We do know that they make billions, and that's with a B , billions of dollars a year from this gambling. So what do we want to do about it? Well, my bill says that it's there. My bill says that we can't stop it, so let's license it. Let's regulate it. Let's protect kids from playing it.

Let's help those who cannot help themselves: the compulsive gambler. Let's help those people by making sure some of the profits that we make from that go towards GAMBLER and other gambling programs, to help those people who can't help themselves. Let's make sure the game is fair and legitimate -- by putting this server on the floor of the casino, have the gaming enforcement people ready access to it that can take that computer out at any time and check the software to make sure that it's legitimate.

If they find that it's not legitimate, the penalty would be not loss of the Internet gaming license, but loss of your land-based license also. So you make it strict enough that no one will fool with it.

So that any person that plays knows that the game is fair and knows if they win, they're going to get paid. How do we help kids? Well, the first thing we need to do is protect the kids from getting to the sites and getting on them. Well, how do you do that? Well, currently, if the kid wants to play, he just goes on and if he's got a credit card number, and he is.

What we propose to do is have science and technology come up with ways to prevent kids from doing that. It already exists. There are things called the thumbprint mouse where no one can play unless you are the thumbprint that's registered to that mouse. There's a bio -- I'm trying to think of the actual words now -- biometrics keyboard, where if I'm the player and I go on, I type my name and my password in 15 times.

Now, I can tell you what my name is and I can tell you what my password is, but if you come on and try to type it in, it won't let you, because it measures the speed and the pressure with which I type. This is all last year. This was technology that was out last year.

I'm sure this year there's 10 other things that are even better than that to protect kids or unauthorized users from getting to these sites, which we currently have nothing of. Right now, anybody can play, keep that in mind. Well, what you do is everyone anticipates how much they're going to play for that particular month. You can't play any longer. You can do that, but three months from now. There's a three-month cooling off period so that you couldn't bet your house and lose it.

You can see the history of every player. Every turn of the card, every roll of the dice is seen forever. We have a history of it. We currently don't have that right now with floor gaming. Every time you roll the dice in the Internet and every time you flip a card, a history is made of that, and that's kept in memory. So, if there's any problem with someone saying, "Hey, I played this, and I didn't get paid, or I should have gotten a blackjack, or I think all the tens are out, I counted the cards," or whatever the situation is, the State would have the ability to go back and look at every turn of the card and every roll of the dice to make sure that it was a legitimate play.

Lastly, dollars for New Jersey. As we all know, we're in a bit of a crunch right now, financially. Where do the dollars for New Jersey come from? Well, the casinos pay a lot of money to New Jersey. A lot of that money goes towards the general budget. A lot of that money goes to the PAAD cards and to help senior citizens buy their prescriptions and other senior programs.

We'll be able to make those programs even better by taxing it, which is, again, money that's currently out there untaxed. You're going to hear, and I suspect you've already heard-- By the way, this legislation is already the law in Nevada. They've done it a little bit differently. Our bill talks to-- We've put certain safeguards in. In Nevada, Assemblywoman Merle Berman put the bill together that eventually became the law in Nevada and said, "The gaming folks will come up with the regulations on that.

We wanted to have more regulations in our bill. But they already have passed this bill, and the governor of Nevada had signed it a year ago. So this is something that is going to happen, eventually, in the state of Nevada. We also hear that the casinos in New Jersey don't want this.

The Casino Association is against it. I find that strange in that those very same casinos are for it in Nevada. Why is it okay in Nevada and not okay in New Jersey? Maybe the reason for that is we don't need two Internet gaming sites. So Nevada might get that, and New Jersey doesn't get it. Maybe they'll save some tax money. I'm not sure exactly how that works. But I suspect that that's the reason for it. In fact, all of the hotels, as far as I know, already have for-fun sites in New Jersey.

You can go on and game right now in Harrah's, New Jersey. And it's fun. You can't bet any money, and you can't lose any money. You can just play for fun. The site is up, it's running, along with many of the other sites. In fact, I'll go one step further and tell you that there are probably some casino owners in New Jersey that, if they're not going to get it in New Jersey, and they don't have a place in Nevada, may go some place else.

Where are the some places else? They'll tell you they're regulated. They're on the Internet, and nobody is watching them. Nobody is watching their software. Nobody knows if, again, if it's honest or fair. So why not do it in New Jersey? Why not protect the very same people who are currently using it and put those bad people out of business.

If organized crime is currently the owner of a site, and it's being run out of Belize, we're going to give the players an opportunity to say, "Play at Bally in New Jersey, or play at Joe's Casino in Belize. They're going to go to the place that they know is legitimate, and it's safe. We will, de facto, put out of business many of these sites that are offshore that could be run by Colombian drug dealers or could be run by organized crime or could be run by some very legitimate people.

But we don't know which are owned by the legitimate people and which are owned by the bad guys. But what we do know is if we regulate it in New Jersey and permit it to play, we could close up a lot of those places, since most of their business is right here in the United States of America. There's been talk in Congress about a prohibition. We should ban this.

Well, I don't know how you do that. We had experience once before with prohibition. There's not too many people on this Committee-- In fact, there's isn't anyone that probably remembers that, but I suspect that there are some people in the audience that might -- at least, their parents may.

Prohibition didn't work with alcohol in the twenties. Prohibition is not going to work with the Internet in the s. This is not the time and the place for prohibition. It's been tried, and it doesn't work. So what do you do? If we can't stop it, we need to regulate it. And by regulating it, we can protect the kids. We can protect the people that need help who can't protect themselves, and we can tax it and make some money for the State of New Jersey and for the very programs that those taxes will sponsor.

So, ladies and gentlemen, I leave it to you. The bill is not up for a vote today, but I would hope at some point it does. And remember that we can't say it doesn't exist, because it does. All you need to do is turn on your computer and go onto the Internet, and I guarantee you, within five to ten minutes, you'll have a site pop up that you can go to gamble at.

So, let's not again be like that proverbial ostrich that sticks its head in the sand and said, "It doesn't exist. So, let's try to protect them. I leave you there. Thank you. Would you stand by for one second, please? Just a question about your bill. Does it differentiate between virtual gaming and live gaming, or does it cover both areas? Our bill is strictly gaming on the casino on the Internet where you'll see the graphics. It's virtual gaming. I know there is someone out there with a live gaming program.

In fact, he did come to my office a year ago. I believe I spoke with the gentleman. It's another way to go, I guess. I don't think it's the best way to go, but I think it's out there. I urge you all to go on to one of these sites. I mean, I did. Not to gamble-- You can go onto these sites, at least the ones I went on -- USA Casino, I think it was -- where you can play for fun, or you can play for real. You go on it, and you certainly click the button that says, "Play for fun.

I mean it. The thing that bothers me the most, when I think about the New Jersey Casino Association being against this and not wanting to do it in New Jersey, but, yes, they want to do it in another jurisdiction, is that people who are going to gamble on the Internet and people who go down to Atlantic City-- I mean, if you're going to go to Atlantic City for the weekend, gaming on your computer is not the same thing.

You're going down to Atlantic City for the restaurants, for the hotel, for the vacation, for the ambiance, for the noise, the glitz. You don't get that in the kitchen of your house. So, when somebody tells me that they'll stop coming to our casino, I don't see that. I think Australia, which had this, didn't see that either. I think a study was done there, and they didn't find that to be at all the situation.

You also may hear talk that Australia stopped it. Well, it wasn't just stopping gambling on the Internet, it was a lot of gaming that was stopped in Australia. Since Australia, you could virtually game anywhere you wanted to. I mean, you close the bathroom door, and there was probably a slot machine. So there gambling wasn't as regulated as here. Isle of Man has just permitted Internet gaming to happen there. I understand the U. Virgin Islands are looking at it.

In fact, it may have already started -- done it and gone ahead and said, "We approve of Internet gaming. It's not going to go away. It's only going to grow and get bigger. If we sit here and talk about it, it grows bigger and more of our kids play and more of those folks, who can't help themselves, lose more money, and New Jersey doesn't get any of it and neither does the United States of America. So let's get it done. Let's do it the right way. Let's protect those who need to be protected.

And quite honestly, let's make some money with it also. So there's no down side to the bill. I just don't understand when people who don't read the legislation, who come out the very next day, after you put it in and say, "Nope. It's a dead issue. It's not going to happen. Try understanding what we're trying to do. And once you understand it, I don't think you can argue with it. Did that answer your question, Jack? Through you, I know exactly what you're talking about, Assemblyman.

People just don't read the legislation. Let me first ask you-- I want to be clear on what you support and what you don't support. Now, you support simulation? All the background has been done. We know they're legitimate business people. I would be -- in addition to this, yes. In other words, give people as many opportunities as you want to give them. You can do it virtual. You can do it any way you want to do it, but not one over the other.

Nicholas, you're absolutely right. However, the only caveat there is, it's not new. It's there. It's been there for a number of years now. My legislation does not permit sports betting. It only permits table gaming, the games of chance that are currently existing on the floors of the casino -- no horse racing, no sports betting, strictly table gaming.

Look, no one has done more gaming legislation and antigaming legislation for kids than I have. Kids by the thousands are taken off the casino floor. The casinos are doing a great job with that. But kids are gaming, and we need to do everything within our power that we can to tighten it up and stop it.

Kids don't need to gamble. It's that simple. Assemblyman, thank you very much. If you want, I'll stick around a little bit, in case anybody has any questions they want to ask. Next I'd like to call Mr. Frank Catania, who is the President of Catania Consulting. Frank, are you alone, or do you have anybody with you? It's a pleasure being back -- a former Assemblyman a few years ago. It's nice being back in the chambers. Just to give a little bit of my background again, I did serve in the General Assembly for a number of years and then was appointed as Director of the Division of Gaming Enforcement and now have a firm, Catania Consulting, which has an emphasis on Internet gaming and also of counsel to the firm of Sterns and Weinroth.

I have to begin by saying Internet gaming already exists. As Assemblyman Impreveduto said today, and I'll probably repeat some of those statistics, most recent statistics, basically, have been that there are probably anywhere from to gaming Web sites currently operating.

That's a significant increase from just a year ago. You'll further hear testimony today from Marc Falcone of Bear Stearns, who can provide input into the figures and projections with regard to Internet gaming. There is no question that billions of dollars are reportedly being bet over the Internet with little, if any, oversight or guarantee that operators of these sites are fair and honest or that protections are in place to keep children and compulsive gamblers away.

These revenue projections imply that a percentage of these moneys are from our citizens and leave the United States with no subsequent benefit whatsoever, directly or indirectly. My support for Internet gambling regulations is concentrated on the exact issues raised by the opponents of Internet gaming.

The solution lies in a strictly regulated alternative aiming at ensuring the presence of harm minimization measures, not the least of which relate to the protection of children and compulsive gamblers. In the gaming industry, it's well-known that in New Jersey and Nevada -- share leadership positions in the gaming industry. And that the business of casino regulation, albeit with a competitive undertone on occasion, the Legislature and the gaming regulators deserve credit for this distinction.

Over the last two years, the New Jersey and Nevada Legislatures both introduced and debated legislation that would legalize, license, regulate, and tax the Internet gaming industry. While the New Jersey legislation, introduced by Assemblyman Impreveduto, never gathered much momentum last year, the Nevada legislation was signed into law last June 14, Assemblyman Impreveduto's research showed that New Jersey residents were already playing casino games on-line and that there exists an element of Internet gaming operators, also know as fly-by-night operators, and have no desire to play fair with these players.

I applaud Assemblyman Impreveduto, Cohen, Azzolina, and Assemblyman Asselta for their foresight to draft legislation to legalize and regulate an industry that historically had flourished in an environment with little, if any, regulatory oversight. The legislation introduced in New Jersey to regulate Internet gaming will do far more to minimize the social ills, including underage and problem gambling than will any attempt at prohibition, let alone no action at all. I submit to this Committee that the question is not whether or not you will have on-line gaming, for in my opinion, you most certainly will, unless you ban the Internet itself.

The question is whether you will have well-regulated, aboveboard, on-line gaming or unregulated, underground, on-line gaming. Adding to the complexity and reflecting the desire of existing, reputable companies to diversify into this new technology, a quick media search will show that at least three large Las Vegas gaming companies -- Harrah's Entertainment, MGM Mirage and Park Place Entertainment -- already offer play-for-fun casino-style games to registered voters -- visitors to their respective Web sites.

I had voters on my mind there. That's it. I keep on coming back. Some licensed casino companies will move forward with Internet gaming plans in other jurisdictions while excluding players from the United States, for at least now. The latest example is Station Casinos, a Nevada licensee, partnering with Sun International, a former licensee in New Jersey and a former owner of Resorts in Atlantic City, in an Internet gaming venture licensed out of the Isle of Man.

They do not take any bets from the United States, nor any other jurisdiction where it's specifically prohibited. Gaming companies realize that they will have to expand to the Internet and will be looking to acquire or align with legitimate Internet companies. Progress and profits will be the motivating factor. The Nevada legislature recognized that Internet gaming legislation would position Nevada in its casino industry to benefit from Internet gaming when the practice of taking wagers over the Internet becomes accepted within the United States.

As a brief update on the Internet gaming on the federal level, the Department of Justice has contended, despite strong opposition, that Internet gaming is a violation of the Wire Act and, as such, is already an illegal activity. However, in February , a Federal Court in Louisiana, in a class action suit against credit card companies brought by gamers who lost moneys while wagering at Internet casinos, rejected the plaintiffs' claims for various reasons.

Included in the determination was a finding that "Internet gaming on a game of chance is not prohibited under 48 U. Section ," or, the Wire Act. The difficulties arise because legislation and control has historically been left to the states, but the very nature of the Internet is global and ignores jurisdictional boundaries. You will hear more about the legal circumstances surrounding Internet gaming from Nicholas Casiello, a partner in the firm of Sterns and Weinroth, later on.

While the Internet poses many challenges to governments and law enforcement agencies, creating a regulatory framework for Internet gaming is a far better solution to this difficult public policy issue. Just like regulation of traditional casinos, there cannot be any shortcuts with regard to suitability, especially in the infancy of Internet gaming.

Any regulatory structure would have to be particularly sensitive of all the allegations and rumors of impropriety over the Internet. The suspicion and mistrust of Internet gambling that exists must be countered by strict regulations -- only those with impeccable suitability and financial viability to be licensed, the same requirements as established for traditional casino licensing. There should be no difference in the licensing process between a traditional gaming license and an Internet gaming license.

The same level of scrutiny needs to apply to the evaluation of systems and games and to the general good business practices and internal controls addressing the operational and administrative processes. There is something that is common with all well-regulated, traditional forms of lawful gaming, and that is something that New Jersey has held a leadership position in throughout its year history with well-regulated casino gambling.

Any questions from Committee members? In your study of this, what type of projection have you heard about as to the annual amount of gambling through the Internet? You do have some well-regulated sites. For example, the Isle of Man, you have Alderney, you have the Mohawk Indians that are just outside of Montreal, which I drew the regulations for. The other sites, basically, there are no reporting. There's no auditing by any regulator, so it's difficult to say.

But Marc Falcone from Bear Stearns will be testifying on that today. I know when I first started talking about this, we were talking about less than , probably somewhere in the neighborhood of sites. And today, we're talking probably about sites. And of those sites, you're probably still only talking about maybe companies that are involved. What they do is they have multiple sites, not just one particular site.

But have you heard that range? I've heard the range in that area. I've heard some projections, basically, that in , you would have approximately 6 billion, I think it was. I think that has now been projected downward to, I think, either 4 or 5 billion. But it is still all billions, and there's a lot of money out there that's being wagered. It's being wagered every single day from everywhere in this country, even thought it's The court, in re MasterCard, the Louisiana case, basically did not say that casino gaming on the Internet was illegal.

They said sports betting was, but casino gaming itself was not considered when the Wire Act was passed in l So that is on appeal. But again, the industry-- Because I think it's the Fifth Circuit that doesn't have to be followed in other circuits in the country. Chairman, one more question? Have you read anything as to how MasterCard, American Express, Visa -- how their view on Internet gaming should be regulated? Should there be a promulgation of regulations in different states?

If it's a bank and if you know the way MasterCard and Visa are set up, they're broken into different parts of the world. It's just that the part here that covers the United States is very concerned about it because of the grayness of the area of Internet gambling. So, here, what they have done -- it's happening now that they are not accepting the credit card payments. However, what happens is they now have other means of paying.

So there are things called FirePay, Pay Bill. These are companies where you take your credit card, you put your money into what they call e-cash. What happens if you're on a gaming site, you use your credit card-- You only can be credited back up to the amount you've originally bet. But some of the alternate methods, similar to the FirePay, you put your money in, and it also goes right back into that other account.

So, even though they're looking at ways of-- For example, Representative Leach has a bill that would prohibit any type of Internet gambling through credit cards and other bank instruments. Right now, there are processes that are happening that would avoid this also. You were talking about underage children gambling. And certainly, if we legalize this in New Jersey, perhaps there would be some way to control that, but they would still have the option, obviously, of gambling on the current sites that are unregulated now.

Is that correct? Those sites that they would probably be able to go to -- where the major problem is, there's no disclosure that there's an age limit. Throughout the world, the age limit is In New Jersey, it happens to be So there is some questions there that have to be worked out. But with regard to underage gamblers, there are different procedures that are worked through the registration process, that there's only a limited amount they could bet until hard copies come into the gaming company of the person's identity.

Not only as to his age, but also where he is located. For example, you're not going to take a bet from the state of Michigan where prohibition of Internet gaming is there. So you will not take a bet from Michigan. If it's in Nevada, you could know that somebody is there, and you could take a bet from Nevada. So, regardless of whether we pass this or not, we're really not going to be able to deal all that well with the problem of children who are underage and gambling.

CATANIA: What happens is, the way I would foresee this to happen is, once you have the well-regulated sites, you're going to have your players going to those sites, because they know that the odds are going to be fair and honest. They are going to know that the people that are there have the financial ability to pay. The same as if you're going to be in one of the casinos in Atlantic City.

It's, basically, if you're going to some of these other sites, it's similar to going to some of these illegal VLTs that you have in some of the cities throughout the state, where you go in and the payout rate is 40 percent, and you don't know if you're going to get paid. I know that the Federal Government is looking at -- this is not with regard to prohibition, but with regard to underage gamblers. They want to see, even the sites that are offshore, to put up some prohibitory language with regard to underage gamblers, that they don't accept it and to try to take some action.

If they were to go to the software providers and ask that this be placed in it, you're going to see that, unless the company is using their own software, that most software providers will have this included in their software packages also. It's part of the Internet, I guess we can't help it. The second question, sports betting, is that allowable on some of these unregulated sites? That's actually allowed in some regulated sites. I mean, that's coming out of the UK, where it's legal. I mean, SportingBet.

I believe it's coming from one of the-- It was coming from one of the British Isles. It's probably back in the UK now. That's happening. I mean, you can do that. And there's nothing specifically that we could do. I think, just as an aside, I think we missed the train, several years ago, when we had the option of doing sports betting in New Jersey, that we didn't do it. Sun International started out with Ambassador Casino in Mohawk territory of Kahnawake and moved to the Isle of Man, and they have a system that, basically-- Nothing can be foolproof.

But what it does, it puts the onus on the individual, if he's underaged, and he really has to work and get some things. There's a sign-in registration form. All the information has to be put in, age, plus there has to be a number for a form of identification.

For example, if it's a passport number, that has to be included. That then goes to the gaming site. The gaming site then sends a pin number or a password in a generic envelope to the player. So, if my son got my card, it's going to be coming to me. It's not going to have on any casino name on the envelope, but it will just be a generic-type envelope, giving me a pin number.

Two weeks after, or whatever time period, that same registration page comes up. You now have to fill it in exactly the same. If there's anything out of the ordinary, you're blocked off. And now, you also have to put in that pin number. And in the meantime, you had to send in the hard copy. These new revenues, the 3 to 5 billion which is coming out, where is that coming from? People that normally don't have access to casinos, or is there an increase in gambling because of the access to this now, or do we not even know, or do you not know at this point?

And basically, it's not the same type of player. It's not the same player that is in -- going to a casino such as Atlantic City or Nevada or Mississippi, where they hear the noise and they want the glitz and all. These are more secluded-type players. That's what we've heard, and I'm sure Marc Falcone can probably give you more information on that also. Accepting the fact that Internet gaming is here, realizing that we would need to license and regulate Internet gaming and also understanding that we would need to protect people, compulsive gamblers, and children, my final question would be: How do you see this affecting the labor market, the job market compared to the way it is now with gaming in Atlantic City, as opposed as to what may happen in the future?

Do you see it as a benefit for the average working person? It's going to be a benefit because any income that comes to it goes to the coffers and is additional income that's not there. It's also something that we have to look at. People say it could hurt the casino industry in New Jersey. That's not the case. I mean, any company that would come in here and say that this is going to hurt them because it's going to take away players, I would argue that case because I think it could actually be a benefit.

It's a marketing tool. I mean, if I'm in Atlantic City and I'm going home and I wanted to go onto Caesars -- and I can go onto Caesars whatever I want to play there -- it's going to be able to bring me back. If I'm there playing for a couple of hours, they can give me a free bus ticket. But it's a marketing thing that could actually bring more employment to Atlantic City and actually bring more business. And the other good thing about it is that you have to have a casino here in New Jersey.

It's not that you can come in and just be an Internet casino, which has no employees. Comparatively speaking, it has no employees. The casino can operate an Internet gaming site with probably just hardly any. Most sites are probably operating with maybe 30, 40 employees. Thank you very much. First of all, I want to say to Assemblyman Impreveduto, I'm probably -- I did a survey back there -- I'm probably the oldest person in this room, and I don't remember prohibition, so Chairman, members of the Committee, I thank you for this opportunity to testify here today on this issue, Internet gambling.

As I'm sure you all realize -- you've heard it now from two speakers, and I'll say it again: gambling over the Internet is here to stay, regardless of what you do or anybody else does. A number of places allows it. You've heard it -- Australia and the Isle of Man, just to mention a couple -- and they have developed systems to attempt to regulate it.

But it really is going to be up to you, and I don't envy your task, by the way, and the people of this State to decide whether legalizing Internet gambling here is good public policy for New Jersey. So what I would like to do today is give you the benefit of our analysis of the issue and some suggestions on what you have to keep in mind as you consider it. Before you act on any legislation, I urge you to find out exactly how the Casino Association feels about this.

And I say that not because we're in the business of promoting casino gambling, but we do know very well what the public policy is here in New Jersey and why casino gambling was established here for very specific purposes. So you have to take into consideration how they feel about this issue. I know that the American Gaming Association has expressed reservations about Internet gambling for a number of reasons.

One is that people have not asked casinos to come into their living rooms, but that is exactly what will happen with on-line wagering and is happening now. New Jersey's casino industry, as I said before, has invested billions, and they have a lot at stake. It's one of the largest industries in the state. You asked a very pertinent question, Mr. Chairman, when you asked how the laboring people, how the 45, people feel about this, in addition to those who own the casinos themselves.

Some of you were here two years ago when I testified about Internet gambling, and I suggested that you, as public policy makers, have to ask yourselves three questions: Is Internet gambling legal, or can it be legal? Can Internet gambling be regulated?

And do the positive impacts of legalizing Internet gambling outweigh the negative impacts? With your permission, Sir, I'd like to go over those with you again today. Is Internet gambling legal? Well, if it were, you wouldn't have bills before you to make it legal. So the answer clearly is no. Can it be made legal? That's what you do, but I think you need to do more than just pass a bill. The State Constitution is a problem in this matter and says, "No gambling of any kind shall be authorized by the Legislature, unless the specific kind, restrictions and control thereof have been heretofore submitted to and authorized by a majority of the votes cast by the legally qualified voters of the state.

I'm certain that it can. Maybe not today, maybe not in the same way we regulate the brick and mortar casinos in Atlantic City, but I'm certain, at some point, we will be able to regulate on-line gaming. Owners and operators already can be investigated and licensed the same way we do it with the casinos in Atlantic City. And at some point, the technology will reach the point where we can conclude that the games are fair and that the financial transactions are secure. You know, and you've heard it here today, that Nevada passed legislation that permits on-line gambling after the regulators there determined that it can be properly controlled.

But you also know by now that, so far, our counterparts in Nevada have not concluded that controls are sufficient to permit wagering over the Internet. About a year has passed, and they've been authorized to do this, but they haven't done it. But it's only a matter of time before they and we, I believe, are comfortable with the levels of control. I noted earlier that the American Gaming Association has reservations about wagering on-line.

It said last year that, "Appropriate regulatory and law enforcement oversight does not presently exist with regard to Internet gambling to properly protect the integrity of the games, the security, and legality of financial transactions" -- a huge item there -- "and against the potentially harmful effects of underage and pathological gambling. Just last week, MGM Mirage announced it had chosen partners to help develop a planned on-line gambling site that will be based on the Isle of Man; a site they hope to open within a year.

Would the positive impacts of Internet gambling outweigh the negative impacts? That's a tough call, because we don't know what the positive benefits of on-line gambling are going to be. If our casinos were permitted to operate on-line gaming, they certainly would make it easier for the people of New Jersey to wager, but I don't know if it would result in a significant increase in casino revenues or if the number of visitors to Atlantic City would decline as people turn to their computers to gamble.

When voters of New Jersey approved casinos, back in , they were promised it would rebuild Atlantic City, create jobs, generate taxes, and so on. If you look at Atlantic City today, you see that casino companies have invested billions there. Businesses that are located in every single county in the state.

More than businesses, employing tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of workers, and they all did business with casinos. There's a lot more coming. That's going to create thousands of new jobs and tremendous economic opportunities for vendors and suppliers across the state. What would the people get for approving wagering across the Internet?

Certainly, if it resulted in increase gaming revenues, it would generate tax revenue. But would Internet casinos build new hotel rooms? Would they buy hundreds of millions of dollars of goods and services from New Jersey companies? I seriously doubt it. Will it exacerbate underage and pathological gambling problems? Other witnesses here today will tell you about systems that they claim will do exactly that.

They will tell you they have virtually foolproof ways to keep anyone under 21 from wagering. They will tell you that with tracking systems or loss limits, they can limit the harm that pathological gamblers can inflict on themselves. Perhaps they can. I hope they can. But as long as we keep reading stories about young people who are incredibly computer savvy, who have hacked their way into the most secure sites, then I personally won't have reservations about how effective and foolproof these systems are.

Let me briefly mention two other matters that you should keep in mind as you weigh this issue. One is that there is federal legislation that would ban Internet gambling. Last week, a House Judiciary subcommittee on crime approved a bill that would amend the Wire Act of to bar on-line wagering.

There are some members of Congress who are staunchly opposed to gambling, and while their efforts to block Internet gambling in the past have undoubtedly failed, they are constantly looking to build new coalitions to get a bill passed. The other matter is that a growing number of credit card companies -- and no matter how anybody slices it, this is a matter of fact -- a growing number of credit card companies and banks are refusing to process transactions with gambling sites.

That could make it a lot more difficult to conduct gambling on the Internet. You have to have the resources to play this game. I commend it to your attention, because you're going to have to collect and weigh all of these matters. In fact, I would urge you, through your committee aide, to communicate with Professor Rose. Certainly, you ought to get some communication from him if your budget does allow you to bring him here to get him to testify. You ought to communicate with him and correspond with him.

It's called, "Internet Gambling Stakes are High. There's a ton of material being generated about Internet gambling. In conclusion, let me say that we are not advocating for or opposing the legalization of on-line gambling. It is up to the people, and you are the representatives of the people to decide whether to change the public policy of the state. But when they do it, they have to recognize what they're doing.

They are, in fact, changing the reason for the passage of casino gambling back in if they do this. If they want it, we will do everything in our power to implement a system of licensing and control to protect the public interest, to ensure that the game are fair, and that the State gets its appropriate amount of tax revenue.

I conclude my official remarks. I'd be happy to answer any questions. And I'm sure Vice-Chair Fedorko would be, too. Hurley, if it is to be the will of the people, that's one reason why we're here today having this hearing, so we can have anyone who has anything to say about Internet gambling testify and give us views from both sides or their personal opinion.

There's a lot of material. He's going to testify, Tom Auriemma, and they are the people that have the technological know-how. But we know in what we read and what we hear, we would conclude that today. Yes, Sir. But again, the question that we keep talking about of being able to keep children on or off the Internet -- and I understand obviously the goal is to keep them off -- but the nature of the Internet, isn't that a moot point?

There's always going to be a certain number of sites, whether we do this or not, that are not going to be sites that are controlled, and they're going to be able to get on them. I picked up on that point that you raised earlier, and I think it's an excellent one. Chairman, my concerns about this are integrity of the game and also the security of it. Also, keeping organized crime out of it, because that was something that-- In fact, I was there the day that the governor signed the bill, Governor Byrne.

He specifically mentioned keeping organized crime out of gambling. Just to give you a situation, and I've been thinking about this on the way down here. In Atlantic City, there's a place called the Ocean Club, which is a condo complex. There's a storefront at the bottom. In one of those stores is a place called the Atlantic City Cyber Cafe, which I've walked by numerous times. How do you regulate people who are going to go in there and gamble? Do we license the cafe owner? How do you regulate -- how do you control the people?

That's, I think -- there's a thousand things that we haven't thought of in this. I commend you for doing what you're doing. I think you have a tiger by the tail, but I think you're on the right track. Thank you both very much for being here today and testifying. Chairman, members of the Committee, as a representative of the Attorney General of New Jersey and the Acting Director of the Division of Gaming Enforcement, the State agency responsible for the regulation of the casino industry in New Jersey, I thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to address the important issue of Internet gambling in New Jersey.

Let me first summarize our past positions on this issue, so you will have a clearer picture of what our options are for the future. In our view, Internet gambling has been and remains illegal in New Jersey under our Constitution, our criminal law, and our civil statutes. However, despite this clear illegality, Internet gambling for real money on casino-style games and sporting events is widely available to any person in New Jersey with a computer and Internet access.

The Internet gambling business is no longer an insignificant cottage industry. Virtually, all such sites are operated from locations outside the United States. Since the inception of the Internet gambling industry in the early s, the Attorney General and the Division of Gaming Enforcement have been closely monitoring developments.

Our concerns about Internet gambling, which have been expressed publicly on many occasions, fall into three basic categories. First, the availability of Internet gambling in New Jersey nullifies our public policy, which is to only legalize and allow certain forms of gambling subject to strict State regulation and control.

In this regard, it is as if outsiders have come in and opened unauthorized illegal casinos within our borders. Second, Internet gambling raises many consumer and public protection concerns. These include: The integrity and financial resources of the operators; the fairness of the games; underage gambling; problem gambling; money laundering; and the misuse of the patrons' financial information.

Both the Division and other agencies of State government have already received complaints from patrons about Internet gambling Web sites. Finally, Internet gambling unfairly competes with our legal and well-regulated casinos and other forms of gambling.

Internet gambling operations pay no taxes in New Jersey and create no jobs or other economic benefits here. What they do is siphon off our residents' money and transfer it offshore, leaving us to address any social problems created in their wake. As a result of our concerns about Internet gambling and the threat posed by its availability to New Jersey citizens, the Attorney General and the Division of Gaming Enforcement have taken several actions.

Recognizing the difficulty of enforcing a prohibition on Internet gambling at the State level, New Jersey joined with the Attorney Generals of numerous other states in urging the enactment of federal legislation to ban Internet gambling.

Following an extensive inquiry in June , the National Gambling Impact Study Commission also recommended enactment of a federal ban on Internet gambling. Despite these calls, however, no federal prohibitory legislation has been forthcoming.

Believing it was our obligation to enforce the Constitution and the laws of New Jersey, even without the assistance of the Federal Government, the Attorney General and the Division of Gaming Enforcement, last year, filed civil lawsuits against 10 offshore Internet gambling operations, which had targeted and accepted business from New Jersey residents. Some of the Web sites had even accepted wagers from underage patrons.

We are continuing to pursue those actions, although we have encountered the expected difficulties and delays in the the serving process and obtaining jurisdiction over the foreign defendants, many of which are located in Caribbean nations. Utilizing a provision in the Federal Wire Act, the Division also sought and obtained the termination of telephone service to several sports wagering operations, which were the subject of the Division's judicial complaint.

However, this procedure proved to be of limited effectiveness due to the large number of toll-free service providers, the complex ways in which such service is provided, and the easy transferability of specific toll-free telephone numbers. Although, as indicated, the Attorney General and Division of Gaming Enforcement have in the past supported and attempted to enforce a prohibition against Internet gambling, we have always recognized that changing times may dictate fresh approaches.

Indeed, while recommending that the prohibition on Internet gambling be maintained for the present, the Joint Report on Computer Crime by the Attorney General and the State Commission of Investigation, issued in June , explicitly recommended that, "In the event a federal prohibition of Internet gambling is not enacted, and State attempts at prohibition prove to be ineffective or contrary to New Jersey's interests, the regulation of Internet gambling should expeditiously be reconsidered.

As I will point out hereafter, there have been certain factual and legal developments that may support reconsideration. First, no federal prohibition on Internet gambling has been enacted. A prohibition bill introduced in the United States Senate, commonly referred to as the Kyl Bill, twice failed to achieve passage and has not been reintroduced. A prohibition bill is pending in the United States House of Representatives and, as of last Tuesday, was referred to the House Judiciary Committee for a vote that has not yet been scheduled.

Interestingly, the bill was recently amended to clarify that states would be permitted to regulate gambling on the Internet, provided they could somehow verify the age of the bettor and prevent out-of-state residents from taking part in the games.

Nevertheless, the bill is opposed by the American Gaming Association and others, and it's fate remains uncertain. Another pending House bill, which has been referred to a House Judiciary subcommittee, would ban the use of credit cards and other financial instruments to pay for illegal Internet gambling transactions. But even if that bill is enacted, the question of what constitutes an illegal Internet gambling transaction would still be left to the determination of existing federal and state law.

Second, although the Division continues to vigorously pursue its cases against various Internet gambling operations, it is obvious that with over functioning Web sites, State-initiated actions against sites on an individual basis will have little impact on the availability of Internet gambling as a whole.

The other option suggested in the Joint Report, the adoption of legislation that would discourage credit card and other financial service companies from providing the means to engage in illegal Internet gambling in New Jersey, is still possible but has not yet been attempted. Third, the technology associated with Internet gambling has advanced and continues to evolve rapidly, raising the possibility of more effective regulation and control than were previously deemed feasible.

The state of Nevada has gone so far as to authorize the licensing and operation of virtual casinos, subject to effective regulatory oversight. And with the full knowledge and approval of the Division, some companies affiliated with New Jersey casino licensees have become involved in Internet gambling in foreign jurisdictions, subject to stringent controls, including a requirement that no business be accepted from patrons identified as residing in the United States or any other location in which such gambling is prohibited.

Finally, state budgetary constraints, as well as increased competition for our casinos from neighboring jurisdictions, including New York, may affect the economic realities. We cannot be certain that if Internet gambling were legalized in New Jersey, it would produce significant additional casino or tax revenues. MAY: The need is always, I think-- The lower you go, more towards the job entry, there tends to be the greater need there at the job-entry levels.

When you go towards the, more, upper levels of management, those tend to be the much higher paid. There is more competition for those jobs. There tends to be more promotion within. However, we do offer certain opportunities for incumbent workers to improve their skills so that they can advance within the industry. Thanks, Doctor. Chairman, one question for Dr. First, let me begin with, I have a little bit of history with your hospitality program.

I happened to be the head basketball coach back in when my program got -- experienced huge budget cuts to create the hospitality program at ACC. MAY: That was before my time. I think Dr. Moore phonetic spelling was there. And he never forgot. I think the question I have relates to your opening statement of your labor shortage and where the future labor pool for the industry lies, and how we must go to that labor pool and take our education there and not expect those people to be able to come to a specific site as close as ACC.

But, most importantly, in Cumberland County -- that I project and see having the largest potential labor pool for the future of the industry -- lies in Cumberland County, with well over , citizens. That, by the way, has a huge unemployment base that is ready to be trained. I guess my question is, is there a possibility there can be a cooperative effort, since Cumberland County has a very extensive community college, the oldest community college in the State of New Jersey by the way?

Is there a way where you and ACC can communicate and coordinate a similar program up there, so that we bring the process of education and employment to the people who need it where the labor base is? In addition, the workforce investment boards within South Jersey are already collaborating for such efforts, because it is clear that there is not the labor pool incumbent in Atlantic and Cape May counties, that there has to be the effort that you are talking about.

We already have a collaborative agreement with Cumberland County for hospitality programs. I think, as soon as the issues of employment opportunities which are there-- That is effectively with us, but also the transportation issues are, perhaps, the most troublesome at this point.

And that means, at this point, to do what we can to provide training for those that would enter the industry. Very good. I noticed over and over again that when we talk about training, it seems to be, generally speaking, the entry-level positions.

And it only goes to a certain plateau. I mean, is that a fair characterization? One of the reasons is very transparent. The more you approach the entry-level position, the more difficult that is. I asked that question because I understand, as the industry in the beginning -- certainly the casino industry -- it had to import people that had the experience.

But now we have a year existence here. It seems like I still hear that we never have the expansion of the programs that are able to develop that high-end wage earner who actually live and have lived here. We talk about people not leaving the area. We want to make sure that people stay here. I hope that we can, at some point, some juncture, begin to expand that training beyond, as I said, that certain threshold. MAY: I want to assure you that the College is committed to doing just that.

We have, certainly, a long way to go. I mentioned that one of our success measures is not until a person has had his or her first promotion in a job after coming through that entry level, but it still is not at the level you are talking about. But we, with our collaboration with Rutgers, I think, are making some progress on that, although we need to go a lot further. MAY: Sure. I have a little problem. As the years go by, my attention span is not quite as good as it used to be.

We definitely want to hear from you. If you have written testimony, and you do desire to summarize it and present the written testimony, that will all go into the record, every single word of it, irregardless. We do want to hear from you. We just want everybody to have a chance, as well.

Not that you were too long, Dr. You were not. It was very interesting. As we go along Is he Yes, there he is. My name is Jack Plackter. We have members, mostly business-oriented members, around the region. Welcome to Atlantic City. You can say our name. She did. She actually started out as a chambermaid in the hotel industry and worked her way up to one of the high-level executives with one of the largest companies in our region, Park Place Entertainment.

He was a teacher and started out in the showroom of Resorts International. But today he runs Showboat. But today she is President of Resorts International. So there are great opportunities for advancement in this industry for people who have the ability. However, it is very competitive.

And oftentimes, people from other areas come in. Also, sometimes people from this area go out to Las Vegas and assume very high-level positions. We have such a unique region in this area. I mean, if you start with Cape May with the Victorian area -- the restaurants, world-class restaurants. You go to Avalon, Stone Harbor, the Wildwoods for probably the best amusements in the region-- You look at the golf courses, world-class beaches We have to get our message out.

This is a unique area. Nowhere do you have the variety within what, I would think, is a 40 mile radius -- really less than an hour drive -- within a mile drive are probably some of the finest vacation experiences anywhere in the world. I have been fortunate enough to be in a variety of places. We need to do more of that. Some of the positive effects-- One, job growth. One out of every three residents of this area works in the casinos, directly, in Atlantic County.

In addition to that, with the multiplier effect, all of us-- Myself, I have a local law practice-- Clearly a substantial or significant part of our practice relates to casinos and tourism. The quality of life-- Because of the industry, this tourism industry, the quality of life for the residents has substantially increased. Prior to about a year ago, if you needed major -- any type of heart procedure, for example, catheterization or open heart surgery, you had to go out of the area, to maybe Camden County or Philadelphia or North Jersey.

The taxes returned to the State -- we all know how significant they are. I just have a couple recommendations. I think there are a couple things that we would ask that you do. First and foremost, we want you to increase the amount of tourism dollars spent.

We, badly, are so in need -- surely need to increase that amount. One interesting statistic is in Atlantic City and this region. The majority of the dollars of revenues is won at the slot machines, the gaming tables, and so forth.

It shows that, with the influx of new transactions -- non-gaming attractions, entertainment venues, restaurants, shopping -- that those tourist dollars can be translated into great additional revenues for the state and for the community, which translates into jobs and And also, going forward, we need the government to continue to be creative.

One of the great things -- and I think Senator Gormley left. The two best examples for that-- If you have a chance to look around, look at the cranes that you see in the sky. You see a crane at Showboat. This is all as a result of the hotel bill that allowed the casinos to reinvest their reinvestment dollars in hotel rooms. I would certainly compliment Senator Gormley and our legislative team that worked on that.

Also, the retail entertainment district legislation, which also is responsible for the quarters project. The improvements on the Expressway are a great thing. Also, streamlining the regulatory process There needs to be a streamlined permitting process -- also with other regulations with the Casino Control Commission and DCA. May talked about, have affordable places to live. We want them to live within a short distance so they can work at these places of employment.

That would be highly detrimental to the future and continued growth of this region as, what I think is, a number one tourist destination on the East Coast. Hopefully, with your help, it will continue to be so. Thanks for coming down to Atlantic City. I hope you have a good time here.

I think that those situations need to be remediated. We now have another celebrity. We have Barbara Altman. Am I correct, Barbara? Am I right? And before Rush Limbaugh. Before I begin, let me just give you an example of how we continue to try to spread the word about Atlantic City, throughout the country and throughout other countries, as well. Oh, no, this is not a bribe. If you each take a copy No long-term wear.

Thank you very much for giving me the opportunity to be here today. Are we doing this on a good day? Is everything aligned for us? I hope it is. ALTMAN: I would say, any opportunity we have to come together and to talk about the future of our state and of this particular region is a good day, and the planets are aligned for all of us.

Forty-three years ago it started. It is an event that brings in people from-- Last year we had people from 30 states and six countries outside the United States. There are people who-- As a matter of fact, just as a little aside, a friend was visiting in Ireland and was at a pub in Ireland. Someone walked in wearing an Atlantic City Marathon shirt. Loved being on the boardwalk in Atlantic City. We have so much going for us here in Atlantic City.

We have the hockey team, the baseball team, and everything that really does enhance the attractions for people to come in and to experience our terrific area. Each year, our marathon has grown larger and larger. What we did was, we decided to make it a festival and to reach out. We knew that hotels were being built and that the expansion was happening here. People were coming here to live. They were coming here to play at the casinos. We thought we would create a place where they could run and play.

We have several different events that happened at the same time. Frank Shorter has been here. We focused on boosting what we had, building what we had to attract people to Atlantic City and to attract people to stay here overnight -- to bring them in and to encourage them to stay for the weekend and make it a weekend-long festival. Our goal for is to have 15, runners on the boardwalk in Atlantic City.

As you saw from the snapshots there, that was just the beginning, when people were just lining up on the boardwalk to get ready for the races to begin. All those people who were in town and all the people who come into town are here to spend money in the hotels, to spend money in the casinos, and to spend money in the restaurants, not just in Atlantic City, but throughout the area.

They go into Cape May County. As I said, there were a couple little ones that sprung up over the past couple of years. I can say that because, at the time that the event was about to be retired, there were less than participants. We promote Atlantic City and New Jersey in national magazines. We do everything we can to make sure that the people here will benefit from whatever happens through the Atlantic City Marathon.

We have people who come in by train. The plane service that is offered -- whatever we have and can make available to people-- They travel by train, by car, by plane, and some can even walk the distance if they live in the area. Only 12 percent of our runners actually are from this area for the Atlantic City Marathon. All come a great distance. The casino industry and many businesses in the area are very supportive and work along side us. I would hope that with your support of tourism in this region and in the State of New Jersey-- It is very important that it continues.

I thank you very much. We thank you for all the good work that you do in Atlantic County and the area, for your commitment to the Marathon, and to just everything that happens in South Jersey. I really would. No shirts. We really want everybody to have a chance to speak. We just want to let everybody know. It will help us wrap that up. Next, we have from the He has left testimony for us that will also be entered into the record. That was Michael Fedorko. So, we have that. Seth Grossman, who I believe, also, has a-- We have everybody on radio today.

How many radio shows do we have? We have a community that really ranges from to depending on the show. Every host has their niche. First, should State government set up a new bureaucracy or a bigger bureaucracy and spend more money to encourage tourism? But that cause and effect-- The sun comes up and the rooster crows.

Is there a connection between what the government spends and the tourism dollars that come in? We all know that North Jersey or Newark wants a third of a billion dollars for a stadium. The third thing, as Mr. But we want the politics out of it. Now, let me go to the remarks that I plan to talk about. I happen to believe that the best thing that the government can do to encourage tourism is to have good roads, clean ocean water, effective police protection. The roads are hurting.

I believe that Route 40 is a disgrace. We had a lot of publicity when John Elliot died from a drunk driver who hit him head on. I submit that his death was caused just as much by that slow, two-lane highway for 68 miles, as it was from the drunk driver.

So I submit that the Delaware River Port Authority should be restructured so that money -- the excess money is applied towards roads leading up to the bridges. That would also solve another problem. If we had a better Route 40 and a better Route 55, it would open Cumberland County up -- the labor pool up to the casinos.

I think we should just reallocate the money where it will do us some good. The sad thing is that when tax dollars are administered by politicians to promote tourism, very often the dollars end up promoting politicians and not the tourism. I submit that most of that effort was devoted more to win voters in the state than to get tourists from outside the state.

It has this whole program set out to increase the gasoline tax, increase the hotel room tax from 6 percent to 10 percent, increase the auto rental tax. Very prominently featured I had a nice vacation there. It was a great deal, because the hotels were over 30 percent empty. Everyone was explaining why business was so bad. Finally, they just imposed one tax too many.

The German newspapers went nuts. They started a whole boycott campaign. So consider the unintended consequences. Again, I think I focused on the issue at hand. We just want to be focused on increasing what has been a very profitable and very productive business and industry for the State of New Jersey.

We agree with you, I probably would bet, on the roads and infrastructure. We can do better. Thank you for being here. Chairman, just really quick There needs to be some clarity to the issue. The concept of this commission, number one, is to bring in the private sector to help designate how to market the industry. The bureaucracy has not proven to be able to do it.

What the legislation does is, it brings to the table the private sector, like this industry down here, to make the decisions, whether it is to create a stable source of funding or not. Quite frankly, there will not be one more State employee hired under this piece of legislation.

You can take that to the bank. The commission and the legislation that we have, right now, pending would not create any more State jobs. It will, really, bring the private sector to the table to let them do the decision-making process on the marketing end, to create more resources. The bottom line is, clarity is important here.

I will E-mail you or send you the legislation so you can study it yourself. There you are. I represent Park Place Entertainment. I came back home to Atlantic City. Atlantic City is my home. I grew up here. I graduated Atlantic City High School.

It was one big flood -- the entire street. I have an uncle now who will not come back to Atlantic City if it rains. I want you to know that some of the comments I make -- very briefly, because quite a few things have already been addressed and said several times. We cannot underestimate the impact that New Jersey Transit has on opening up communities for people to come to work in our area. It is a very critical point, and there are places particularly relative to Cumberland County.

And are we currently, now, involved with continuing moneys that are provided through the Federal coffers that come into our area as a two-county entity? New Jersey Transit is a major player in the routes that are done. I graduated from a Methodist school where gambling was more or less questionable.

But the opportunity was brought home. And this is what I think needs to be emphasized. But the basics, the fundamentals When I was asked to come back home, I said I knew nothing about gaming. But I knew how to read, write, and follow instructions. Those who have gone through working and training programs -- particularly when you talk about entry-level people I worked every year since then. And money was taken out of our pay, whether we ate food at lunch or not.

When I made the decision to come back home, there were some things that were very important to me. I grew up in an area where Atlantic City was stratified by race. If you lived on the north side, everyone knew you had to be African-American. If you lived on the south side, you, obviously, were not. There are a lot of these things that have gone away, with a lot of the way that people have gotten to work together.

It may have been about seven years ago. They did an inquiry of the rate of turnover within gaming properties in this area. We were very pleased to have come out of that survey with having been the company that had the largest number of people who have been on staff for 15 and 20 years.

But I came in here as a planning consultant. I am a city planner by profession. I have a MCRP degree. And the first question was, what will be the impact of gaming on the world? And I really thought that was funny at the time. I mean, in -- on the world?

We were just trying to get it in Atlantic City, if you recall. It was to go at the various seashore areas. So, over the period of time, what I have seen -- and the ability to impact on communities -- is a gaming industry that the people Have I done five minutes already? The people who have been a part of it have been, very much, embodied with doing that.

So, perhaps, if you ask me a question, I can answer in the next two minutes. That way I can make my other points. I think you hit just about every point. Well my main emphasis is transportation. The second point I want to emphasize is curriculum.

We have to get schools throughout the State of New Jersey, from elementary school on, to embrace what hospitality and tourism is, because that, then, allows the young people to see that as a particular option to work and be in a profession. Good points. Who do we have here now? Good afternoon, Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee. My name is Jeff Vasser. I would just like to add that I think a way to approach it is making Atlantic City more of a destination. So, I appreciated that question.

My remarks have been submitted for the record, so I will just touch on the highlights. Atlantic City, in particular, as we just said, faces increased competition from surrounding gaming jurisdictions. And New Jersey, in general, faces increased competition from other tourism destinations. An example we use here is the research we did on the economic impact of the inaugural season of the Boardwalk Bullies ice hockey team.

Their spending is only a small part of the tourism cycle that creates jobs, supports families, and provides taxes to municipal, State, and Federal governments. Conventions also provide a positive impact on the economy, and a positive tourism image helps attract conventions. That impact was spread among hotels and motels, many almost an hour away from Atlantic City. That example is a good one of how we all benefit from promoting our location, attractions, and amenities.

New Jersey ranks 23rd in U. On the other hand, Pennsylvania ranks 3rd and outspends us with a budget almost four times what we spend. Along with an increased budget, we need to look at what we promote and how we promote New Jersey. The enduring slogan fit almost every situation and became even more poignant after September The campaign served a double purpose. It instilled a new pride in New Yorkers and, at the same time, made an often-maligned state and city loveable in the minds of tourists.

As a direct result of that campaign, the increase in travelers to New York state the first summer after that campaign was inaugurated -- it generated approximately 1. That was despite a severe gas crisis and an onset of a recession. We need to cement our vision of where New Jersey is positioned, both internally and externally.

We need to carefully identify target audiences and hit them with consistent messaging. Most states that stand to benefit greatly from a healthy tourism economy are well represented at key travel shows. New Jersey is not. We would like to see that important component enhanced. The State tourism office can serve as an umbrella organization for constituent agencies and tourism venues, representing a well-defined, unified product.

It is a proven fact that partnerships garner success. Effective coordination of our state, regional, and local advertising budgets, themes, and programs makes sense for all of us. As the State runs an ad in a key consumer publication, the augmentation of additional placements by counties, cities, and attractions, with a call to action on the part of the reader, can strengthen that message and anticipated goal of additional visitorship to the state.

The State tourism office, if elevated to a cabinet level position, can take a stronger position in coordinating the efforts of many of the smaller tourism attractions in the state. With that, I will end my comments and entertain any comments that you have.

Thank you, Jeff. Mayor, did you want to speak? My partner and I own a historic bed and breakfast in Absecon -- no commercial. In that proclamation, he stated several things quite clearly. Of that, there are , jobs directly attributable to tourism. Tourism is the number two industry in this state and is quickly moving to become the number one. And most economists predict that in five to seven years, tourism will be the number one industry in the State of New Jersey.

In Atlantic County here, there are 45, jobs that are directly attributable to tourism. And in the summer, that increases by 17, jobs. So there are 62, workers, right this month, who are working in the tourism business. Sixty percent of the county gross product in Atlantic County is attributable to tourism. Our Southern Shore Tourism Council is working with the Greater Atlantic City Tourism Council, for the past four or five months, to develop marketing efforts jointly to promote all of southern New Jersey.

They should be commended for that. There are a few other things here. We have 80 members that are volunteers. In the State of New Jersey, there are volunteers who work for tourism at no pay. These people should be commended for their effort. We have a lot of them here today that are members of our Council, who are here to make sure that the State supports tourism.

Any questions? I do remember. You mentioned that there are various districts within the state, I think Cumberland and Cape May It seems to me that there are, at times, barriers in terms of turf. For a future date That also includes Cumberland County, as well. Cape May County alone is taking , of these guides to distribute to their people who are interested in Cape May County. All I have to do is engender that enthusiasm up here in Atlantic County. Now, Mark Wampler.

He is representing the Hamilton Mall. I actually think that my wife and my daughter should be representing the Hamilton Mall. Hopefully, everyone does. The Hamilton Mall has been around for 15 years. The past three years have been very good times. Our sales have been up. Over employees work in the mall. We are bucking every trend in retail. The national retail is down. Northeastern retail is down. So we ask for continued support for tourism in the area.

We also ask for any additional support you can give. You all like those rainy days, as well, right? Is he still here? Where is he? There he is. I own Avalon Limousine. I drove in California, in San Diego, which is a big tourist town. I lived there for 25 years growing up, and I moved here 25 years ago -- well, back and forth. Anyway, the limousine business in Atlantic City is a big business. Only about 10 percent comes from that, though. I drive regular people during nights on the town, anniversaries, weddings, things like that.

The tourism -- well, obviously, during the summertime -- is our biggest time. We do triple the business that we do during the winter. So we, kind of, have to save our acorns for the winter. Everything was planned. They planned a little bit farther ahead. I just talked to somebody from San Diego the other day. When I left San Diego County, there were , people. But the differences between there and here-- It is a little bit like happy days, but in the past 20 years, this area has come a long way.

I drive New York. I know New York. I know Philly. I know D. The people here are I think one of the things in tourism is that the people themselves, who live here, have to be a little bit educated about the area.

I meet so many people who grew up here their whole lives, and they have no idea of the history of this area. I think that should be one of the things that should be part of tourism, to make the people themselves proud and aware of some of the things that have gone on in history here. The other thing is, the roads need a little bit more modernized.

Some of the-- One of the things-- One of my peeves as a driver, in going from one area to another, is where the lanes change from three lanes to two lanes. You avoid a lot of accidents that way, and slow-ups, because people have advance notice this lane is going to end, not some little sign that says the lane is going to end feet.

The third thing is, I drive all over. I never see any signs anywhere promoting the state, like Cape May or Wildwood or anything. I think that would be the third idea. Other than that, I think everybody hit on everything. If we have the good spirit towards us Oh, okay. We thank you for being here. We do want to hear from everybody. We appreciate your business.

One real quick question. How much does a limo cost -- a new Lincoln limo or a Cadillac limo? I was just curious. How about Deborah Dowdell. Where is Deborah? There you go. I knew you were here. Deborah is representing the New Jersey Restaurant Association. Just so you know, I read much faster than I summarize. I am here today to represent the restaurant and hospitality industry.

Thank you for the opportunity to present some constructive comments and observations about the tourism industry in New Jersey, as well as in South Jersey. I would like to begin by saying that we are very proud to be an integral part of an industry that contributes so much to the Garden State.

And as an organization, we are committed to working with the State to continue to enhance the industry. We are here today, also, to underscore that complementing the miles of beautiful shoreline, Pinelands, historic sites, antiquing, outlet shopping districts, major sporting events, farm tours, water sports, festivals, cultural destinations, and casinos are 21, restaurants in New Jersey, offering everything from quick nourishment in comfortable, family-friendly surroundings to world-class dining.

And of the , employees, there are -- , of them work in the restaurant industry. When you think of tourism, you might not necessarily think of restaurants, although I am pleased to say that today I heard many references to restaurants. There are dedicated professionals promoting the state, outstanding businesses poised to provide memorable products and services for our visitors, and we have the built-in natural resource in our magnificent state.

However, the weak part of the equation is the amount of funding the industry receives and the perceived lack of a coordinated, meaningful, and effective message that is disseminated both in-state and out-of-state. The NJRA strongly urges the State to increase tourism funding and to provide adequate funds to provide an aggressive, sophisticated, coordinated, and centralized promotion of the Garden State.

Despite our tight budget, given what our surrounding states spend on tourism funding, an increase in tourism funding in New Jersey is critically necessary and will be an investment that will generate multitudes of rewards for the State. We asked the members from Mercer County to Cape May to comment on the status of the tourism industry this season.

They offered the following for your consideration: for those businesses by the shore, the weather has cooperated superbly. The beginning of the season, May and June, saw sales greater than last year, some members reporting double-digit increases. They all noted a decline in the foreign traveler. They also noted that the amount of travelers checks is down significantly, one member reporting by 90 percent.

They have seen that the use of credit cards has doubled. What seems to have sustained the beginning of the summer was the day-tripper, with many of our members reporting that the very definition of tourist must be definitively redefined. Our own residents, who may be on business, taking a day off, or spending the week at the shore, are all tourists.

Many of our members reported that they have seen a sharp decline in boaters. And they attribute this to the heightened discussion of, frankly, the corporate business tax increase, and the stock market plunges, and the basic economic uncertainty we see today. They have noticed a dip in business recently. So, I would say in the past three weeks, they have noticed a downturn in what was perceived before as a large increase compared to last year.

The labor pool remains a problem, with training being the number one concern expressed by our members. NJRA is currently working with the Department of Labor to attempt to develop programs to address this problem. There really is a large image problem in the industry. In conclusion, imagine the positive impact of increased funding on the industry.

We would be happy to work with the State on a dining guide, which was also something that our members felt was lacking in the state. That could be complemented by an on-line guide. There are several other states that do this effectively. We also encourage the State to promote dining out to our own resident travelers, as well as to our neighboring states.

We need to spread the word. We encourage the State to fund welcome centers so that travelers can easily access visitor information and can properly welcome them to our beautiful state. We urge you to always remember that the tourism season is in the summer, as well as all seasons. Our tourists are international, national, and local. Well done. Now we have our other Mr. Kelly, Jack Kelly. I am Jack Kelly. I will be very brief.

I will just say one thing. One speaker talked about whether adding to the investment is smart or not smart in New Jersey. Does it bring in anything extra? Let me tell you that one of our greatest destinations from the Atlantic City Airport is to Orlando, Florida. It takes money to make money. This is a great idea, to make this a stand-alone department, and to put a professional director in that can be there for more than one administration and continue the effort of saying that New Jersey is a great destination.

You invest great moneys there. This would be an investment that would help that airport to grow. Thank you for having us here today. See, less than five minutes. Thank you, Freeholder. Who brought them in first, comes first. Some of the great comments made today and some of the facts that I wanted to bring out were, actually, covered already very well by Jeff -- the other Jeff, from the Convention Center. You can pour it. Reason being, there were -- about two out of three facilities were private in those days.

Now, there are 28 million players. And about a third of them live within a three hour drive of our region. And 70 percent of all golf facilities are public access today. That means we have a tremendous opportunity to add diversity to our region, to our state.

Back in , just an aside, when the Atlantic City Convention Center was being built and the then-staff was taking Atlantic City on the road to introduce it to New York, Chicago, and other venues, we read about the story. I was representing some golf courses at the time. Well, that spurred a breakfast meeting, about a week later, of golf course owners in the region, private, public, whatever, and put it all together -- and put an association together. This is not an association of just people who meet and talk about the industry.

This is an association that every one of those members -- the founding members put -- invested over a half a million dollars each. The results have been that Atlantic City and the State of New Jersey, by the way, is now positioned as a golf destination, which it was never considered that, previous to this.

All the national publicity that Atlantic City has garnered for its quality golf has resulted in more awareness of the State of New Jersey and the golf it has to offer. This private funding has spurred this over the past seven years. That means the local golf -- our founding association -- has a smaller piece of the bigger pie. But they are the ones who are funding that, driving that business.

What has resulted is-- The mission of the Association was to drive multiple-day stays to the region. That was what they felt was necessary. They would not grow their business with just local golf. They needed to be a part of tourism. So they formed this Association. And, with this marketing campaign, they set up a very convenient way for tourists to book here. They set up an electronic network long before Internet became popular. We were one of the first destinations along the East Coast to be able to book that region on-line for multiple-day stays here.

They connect the golf courses and the hotel partners to a central call center, a central Website -- one resource that can build the entire golf package.

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Add to Chrome. Sign in. Home Local Classifieds. News Break App. Read Full Story. Clearly livid, Gillian launched The county is now averaging new cases per day over the past week. The county has a seven-day rolling average positivity rate of 1. This story has been updated to note that Lake County until was not authorized to impose a motor fuel tax but tried twice unsuccessfully by referendum to impose a sales tax for transportation. Lake County officials appear ready to authorize a fuel tax to help fund a huge to-do Two local Atlantic County school districts are mourning an educator whose career brought her to both towns.

The Ventnor woman started her career as a first-grade The Supervisors voted to approve a resolution to pass the fiscal year maximum tax levy. The maximum increase in the tax levy will be 97 cents total. The Supervisors also approved a resolution to set a public hearing on the fiscal year budget for a.

March Over the past four years, Amarillo taxpayers have seen their tax bills increase consistently, with unanimous support from the Amarillo City Council nearly every year. However, now that the incumbents are running for re-election, they are trying to spin the tax increase issue to avoid responsibility for the skyrocketing tax rates in Amarillo.

The Amarillo Pioneer. The City Council voted , with at-large Councilman Dave Sires dissenting, to approve the fiscal year Waterloo Cedar-Falls Courier. The governor said during a winter storm briefing at the Statewide Traffic Management Center in Fords that the Gloucester County site will also remain open for the time being. All others are closed.

Atlantic City Press. Many opponents of the renaming There were more than 1, newly confirmed COVID cases reported in the Hudson Valley overnight as the region saw a slight uptick in its positivity rate. A total of 1, new COVID cases were reported in the Hudson Valley in the past 24 hours, according to the state Department of Health, as the seven-day average infection rate rose to 4. Other deaths were reported as follows: two Atlantic City women ages 78 and 57; a year-old Egg Harbor Township man; two Galloway Township women ages 87 and 93; a year-old Hammonton woman; a year-old Linwood woman; and a year-old Pleasantville man.

Eight of the nine had known pre-existing conditions. New Jersey. With weed now legal in New Jersey, municipalities across South Jersey are starting to take a look at where and how — if at all — cannabis could best work in the community. Phil Murphy signed three bills into law on Monday legalizing the possession and use of marijuana by adults over 21, as well as the purchase and sale of marijuana.

House Bill passed on Tuesday, only one day after it was introduced and passed the House Ways and Means Committee. The bill would phase out As of Wednesday, Feb. In Jefferson Parish, the percent You may also like. See how your county fared. Murphy's school spending plan cuts funds to all but two Sussex County districts. New Jersey Herald. Justin Bieber is a Canadian singer and songwriter who was taken the music world by storm.

Releasing his first album at the age of 15, he has gone on to become one of the most talked about artists in recent times, both for good and bad reasons. Bieber was discovered by a talent scout via YouTube. He achieved immense success following the release of his singles from his debut EP 'My World'. He retained his soaring fame with the release of his debut studio album 'My World 2.

He has also released a couple of remix albums, two biographical concert films, and has appeared on numerous television shows to perform live. He has been just as famous for his past relationship with pop-star Selena Gomez as he has been infamous for his numerous celebrity hook-ups. He also has had several run-ins with the law, culminating in arrest a couple of times for DUI and dangerous driving. One of the extremely popular entertainers of today, Jennifer Lopez has shown her versatility to the world as a dancer, actor and singer.

She is still considered by many as the most ravishing woman in the entertainment industry. With the dream of becoming a "famous movie star", Lopez left her hometown for New York and started her journey as a dancer. Soon her beauty and talent was discovered and thus, began her film career. Later on, when she gained fair amount of success as an actor, she diverted her attention towards singing.

In no time, her songs became a rage and were charting at no. Her sensational dances in the music videos rapidly enhanced the sales and got her a celebrity status. However, as she remained in constant public attention, her relationships served as a fodder for celebrity gossips. She married thrice - two of which lasted for a year or even less. She was married for the longest time to singer Marc Anthony with whom she has two children, but then, like her previous marriages, it could not last forever.

Her amazing performance in 'The People v. Simpson: American Crime Story', where she played a public prosecutor, earned her several awards including an Emmy. Born in Tampa, Florida, she began her acting career as a teenager right after she passed out of high school.

Paulson has also appeared in a few films. She played a supporting role in the popular drama film '12 Years a Slave'. The film was a huge hit and won three Oscars. She also played a significant role in the romantic drama 'Carol' which was also a huge success and received six Oscar nominations.

Andrew Cuomo is the current governor of New York. Apart from being a politician, Andrew is also a lawyer and an author. He started his political career as the campaign manager for his father, Mario Cuomo, in He then worked as an assistant attorney in New York. During his first term, he legalized same-sex marriage and controlled gun laws. He was elected for a second term in He is again contesting the election in He is the 56th governor of New York.

Amber Heard is an American actress from Texas who has starred in various movies in different and unconventional roles. She gained recognition from these movies and soon began to star as the lead actress. She has since been a part of several commercially successful films and has been noticed for her taut and convincing performances. Raised in Austin, Heard is known to have made her way through Hollywood through grit and determination as she came from a humble background. A lot can be blamed on COVID, but Atlantic County has risen to meet many of its challenges thanks to the dedication of our workforce.

They have worked around the clock to provide testing and contact tracing. Public Health has been providing vaccination clinics at Atlantic Cape Community College where they will soon be completing second doses before deploying our staff and resources to the mega site at the Atlantic City Convention Center. Nearly 30, Atlantic County residents have been vaccinated, designating us with one of the highest vaccination rates in the state. I want to commend Michelle Savage and the Meadowview Nursing Home staff, which suffered unimaginable losses in the beginning of the pandemic.

They persevered when long-term care facilities were hardest hit, providing care and compassion for residents and family members who were unable to visit. Residents who depend on home delivered meals have been able to receive them thanks to the efforts of Alan Knudsen and Support Services.

Despite the closure of senior centers and nutrition sites, Chris Wilson and the Division of Intergenerational Services have continued to assist seniors and those with disabilities. Warden David Kelsey and his staff have done an extraordinary job.

The jail implemented a day quarantine protocol in the early days of the pandemic. Jerry Griffin and the Division of Facilities have been tasked with coordinating daily cleanings, supplying sanitizing stations and plexiglass partitions. This is in addition to their normal activities. Planning Department Head John Peterson and County Engineer Mark Shourds have continued an aggressive road and bridge program, sometimes with skeleton crews, but without a hitch.

Greg Brookins and Public Works have maintained the safety of our roadways while Parks and Recreation have enabled our citizens to continue to enjoy outdoor activities. Forrest Gilmore and the Department of Family and Community Development have addressed an increased demand for welfare programs. Forrest implemented limited in-person contact to protect the health and safety of customers and staff. Fran Kuhn and the Workforce Development Board are offering job training opportunities to help the unemployed and dislocated workers.

County Counsel Jim Ferguson is working to consolidate our municipal courts to provide cost savings. But to be successful, we will need the cooperation of municipal officials, many of whom are reluctant to give up home rule. Thanks also to Linda Gilmore and her team for their indefatigable persistence in keeping us all informed. Now for the budget. The numbers I present today are based upon the information available. As you can see, the tax increase for the costs controlled by the county is negligible — only three-tenths of a penny.

Our past practices of pay-as-you-go have put us in a more favorable position than most. Our low net debt, conservative management and long-term planning provide stability. Atlantic County continues to have some of the lowest property taxes in the state.

Ranked highest to lowest, Atlantic County is 18th of 21 counties. This message would be incomplete without my thanks to Chairwoman Maureen Kern and the Board of County Commissioners for your unwavering cooperation during this past year of sadness and uncertainty. No county executive could be more appreciative of their legislature than I am. Together, we have demonstrated time and time again, that Atlantic County is here for our residents, to provide a safety net for the most vulnerable and a vision for a better future.

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CASINO PURCHASING MANAGER

It relates to Wildwood, and Millville and Bridgeton are also included. So, consequently, you have money set aside by the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority already for investment in those communities. Now, I think with Wildwood it could be used for tourism. There have not been specific projects or ideas brought forward. And, also, that same redevelopment money has also gone -- has already been designated for Pennsauken. In some towns-- it would be for tourism if it be Wildwood.

In Pennsauken, it would be more for economic development, retail, or whatever of that nature. So that is occurring. We did the bill last year. Senator James was the co-sponsor. That was one of the themes of the legislation. One example-- They just mentioned Camden. Pinky just mentioned Camden. That is as a result of an interaction.

I think the more we have of that, the better. But I do think that, in terms of specific projects, that, shall we say -- it would need some, shall we say, local legislative focus to move some of these things along. Specific ideas have to be brought forward, but those are regions for which that money was designated. Just as Pinky stated, it worked because it was on a nonpartisan basis. Everybody voted for it across the board. Everybody understood what it would do.

Atlantic City has been blessed. It has an enormous amount of capital, enormous amount of investment. And a lot of those things that can make a difference in other regions, hopefully, can occur because of the investment dollars that Atlantic City is now -- which has been spreading around the state, but is doing it in a more focused manner now.

The potential of Atlantic City is great. The investment dollars are more than I think we could have anticipated, which will mean the fund for the seniors and disabled will grow significantly. You get along a lot better.

You just get along a lot better. And that can happen. I want to thank you for coming today, and thank you for the opportunity to testify. Thank you very much. We now have our County Executive, Dennis Levinson. The Senator and I have certainly got our comeuppance. I would like to welcome you on behalf of Atlantic County government and Atlantic County citizens.

The Lord does help those who help themselves. Over , are employed in the tourist industry -- Atlantic County alone -- 60, directly. It woke New York up. Gambling, in many cases, is like buying a lottery ticket. You go to the closest vendor.

And Delaware has certainly shown that, with the slot machines. People coming up from the south stop in Delaware. Consequently, we better become much more aware and not take for granted what we have. We all are very much aware that the front-runner, at this point in time, Ed Rendell, is an advocate of casino gaming. If he is successful, are we going to have boats on the Delaware?

Is that a possibility? We have a year head start. I am here to ask you to push as hard as you can for a cabinet position, which, of course, will get far more attention than not being a cabinet position. So what are we doing here in Atlantic County? I put together an ad hoc committee of interested people who care, most of them are with a vested interest.

I want them to have a vested interest. They are going to come in with a report. That report will be given to you. When a substantial amount of money is put in there -- taxpayers money -- what are you going to do with it? We do have a lot of money that comes into our coffers, and then we have to figure out how do we want to spend it.

You know that, as being a local official. Consequently, before money is spent, there should be a plan. We intend to have a plan, possibly the first in the State of New Jersey. We can even use it as a pilot program throughout the whole State of New Jersey. You do have funding available.

Now you have to apply for it. We want people to know how diverse we are. We want to talk about more than just our beaches and our ocean. We want to talk about more than the three great attractions that we have, which interestingly are -- one centrally located with Six Flags, one up north with the Meadowlands, and down here with Atlantic City. In conclusion, I want to thank you once again.

Hopefully, this is not-- Being in government as long as I have been -- and in all due respect -- and myself included when I say this-- We have hearings. We have committee hearings, and we listen, and we take notes, and we nod, and we all agree. I thank you for your indulgence. We have a question from Assemblyman Asselta for you.

In light of-- And you made a strong point, and a valid point, of the next Governor, possible, of Pennsylvania will be Ed Rendell, who is a huge advocate of gaming, who I would suspect his first major legislative initiative would be to create gaming on the Philadelphia waterfront Now, how would that impact Atlantic City, number one, if you have any insight on that? And, number two, would you suggest a possible expansion of gaming, on a limited level, to defend ourselves against this possible initiative?

Most certainly, competition is good. We welcome competition providing the fact that we are prepared for it. We were the only game in town for the longest time. This will not be the case in the near future. Hopefully, it will be the case. I can give quite a long speech, also, of what the downside is. This is going to cure all of your problems.

Well, guess what, you will have problems. At this present time, you end up with -- it synthesizes -- you end up with something new, a new thesis. Other areas, other venues have to understand the downside. This is not infinitesimal -- that gamblers are going to just -- going to continually come in. The more venues you have, and the more areas they can go, the more convenient it is, and the more comfortable it is for them to be there.

So, consequently, we want to make sure our transportation, to bring people into Atlantic County, to stay in Atlantic County, to visit our area-- We are in total and compete-- When we do have total and complete competition from our surrounding states, which I imagine we will have, we should be prepared. What we are, at this present time-- I do not believe we are prepared.

So, to answer your question, will it have an impact? It most certainly will have an impact. Will it have as much an impact as Delaware? More of an impact than Delaware. We have the finest restaurants in the world, the finest chefs in the world, the finest entertainment in the world if you just want to talk about Atlantic City itself. The accessibility to come into Atlantic City, taking the Parkway, the Expressway, the Black and Whitehorse Pikes-- This is something we do have, and we should capitalize on it.

Take a look at other areas. Make sure that this is the most glamorous spot in the east to go to. That competition would be pretty stiff when you have your audience coming from the Philly area and the New York area -- your tri-state area.

So we do have a head start. Once again, in conclusion, let us not squander it. I hope I answered your question. Currently, we have an advantage. We started much earlier. But we need a coordinated, focused effort. They talk about the person with the plan. So the ambiance of Cape May and the other things we have -- the other attractions we have in Cumberland County and Ocean County and Atlantic County, these also should be pushed, most certainly.

And if we do all that we should do, it will continue to be that way, because we do have a head start. You brought this up. Just one more comment. Any of the other Assemblymen? My remarks will focus on an issue that is of significant concern for the future expansion of the casino industry.

And that, specifically, is labor shortage. The tourism and gaming industry in our area will face a labor shortage over the next three to five years. The following information supports this assertion, and I do have some backup material that will go along with this. The population of the Atlantic City labor area, consisting of Atlantic and Cape May counties, is projected by the New Jersey Department of Labor to grow by 10 percent, while employment growth of 15 percent is anticipated in the period.

The casino industry, alone, will need more than new employees over the next two years to satisfy both industry expansion and turnover. In , the citizens of the state voted to establish the Atlantic City casino area as a resort destination. That was during the year of I think this is particularly significant because, if we look at the current downturn in the economy in the State, the tourism industry is going in the other direction.

We are actually providing more revenue. The hospitality industry has outgrown its infancy and is facing new expansion. In , the industry had a net job growth for Atlantic and Cape May counties of 3 percent, double that of the State job growth of 1. These new jobs developed without large expansion or new development in the casino industry. In addition, even entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry have become more technologically based and require more English proficiency, reading comprehension, math proficiency, and work readiness.

For example, a hotel front desk clerk needs to be computer and software literate, so that the job of tracking rooms, serving guests, and projecting vacancies can be accurately accomplished. A casino floor pit clerk no longer tracks guests by hand, but swipes guest cards and tracks spending at the table on a laptop computer. The position of cashier consistently ranks high as a high-demand job vacancy. Each casino hotel in Atlantic City has extensive marketing departments where computer literacy is a fundamental skill in tracking customer databases, special events, and promotions.

Even housekeeping attendants in several hotels use computers to effectively manage workloads. Clearly, the hospitality industry has entered the 21st century information age. Unfortunately, many of these new and incumbent employees lack the literacy skills to achieve the productivity needed to grow with the industry. The most important ingredient in keeping the hospitality industry healthy is a productive, customer-friendly, English proficient, and literate workforce.

The Atlantic Cape Community College has played a key role in providing employee recruitment and training for the tourism and gaming industry. We have degree programs, for example, hospitality and tourism and culinary; and continuing education programs, for instance, our Casino Career Institute, corporate training, and job readiness that are designed to meet the human resources needs of the tourism and gaming industry.

In addition, the college has played a leadership role in assisting the hotel casino industry in obtaining New Jersey Department of Labor training grants under the Office of Customized Training. Investment of public funds in employee recruitment, training, and upward mobility, especially as it relates to underserved populations who are needed in the workforce, is sound public policy. And third, the casino industry and the following agencies should continue to work together to effectively address the dual problems of employment needs by industry and of unemployed or underemployed workers.

Through this collaboration, regional employee recruitment and training initiatives are possible, which will contribute to the needs of the industry for workers and the needs of citizens for jobs. I thank you very much for this opportunity to address the Committee. May, I have one quick question.

Any statistics or idea of the staying power of these jobs? How long do people stay with them? Do they stay committed to them? Do they move on or up or out? Do we have those types of numbers? MAY: It really depends on the level we start.

But in terms of those most in need, those that perhaps have been chronic welfare recipients MAY: Yes. The effectiveness of getting them through our training, where that is basically job-readiness training, is approximately 40 percent, which may not sound high, but that is actually quite good for that part of the population.

MAY: That aspect is very new. I would be able to get you statistics. But, quite honestly, at each level along there, we do, in fact, have attrition there. May, thank you for coming and testifying today. Out of curiosity, students coming to Atlantic Community College-- What would you say the ratio is of students who express an interest in working in, say, the casino industry versus going off into other -- accounting and other careers? Is there just a ballpark ratio of what happens?

But I would make a side comment. For instance, students that come in accounting-- Many of them will wind up in the casino industry. There is a certain core of programs we have that is directed to moving -- vocational programs that are directed to moving students directly into the casino industry. These are typically through our Casino Career Institute. We will train dealers. We will train a wide spectrum of people, directly, for the industry.

Of course, with that group -- and that is mainly noncredit training -- those will, essentially, entirely move into the casino industry. When we look at our general education population, however -- that is, those that are the accountants, those who are in the business curriculum, and so forth -- you also find a very substantial fraction of them moving into the casino industry, if for no other reason than that is the premiere industry in our area.

I will give you a rough ballpark figure. MAY: The need is always, I think-- The lower you go, more towards the job entry, there tends to be the greater need there at the job-entry levels. When you go towards the, more, upper levels of management, those tend to be the much higher paid. There is more competition for those jobs. There tends to be more promotion within.

However, we do offer certain opportunities for incumbent workers to improve their skills so that they can advance within the industry. Thanks, Doctor. Chairman, one question for Dr. First, let me begin with, I have a little bit of history with your hospitality program.

I happened to be the head basketball coach back in when my program got -- experienced huge budget cuts to create the hospitality program at ACC. MAY: That was before my time. I think Dr. Moore phonetic spelling was there. And he never forgot. I think the question I have relates to your opening statement of your labor shortage and where the future labor pool for the industry lies, and how we must go to that labor pool and take our education there and not expect those people to be able to come to a specific site as close as ACC.

But, most importantly, in Cumberland County -- that I project and see having the largest potential labor pool for the future of the industry -- lies in Cumberland County, with well over , citizens. That, by the way, has a huge unemployment base that is ready to be trained. I guess my question is, is there a possibility there can be a cooperative effort, since Cumberland County has a very extensive community college, the oldest community college in the State of New Jersey by the way?

Is there a way where you and ACC can communicate and coordinate a similar program up there, so that we bring the process of education and employment to the people who need it where the labor base is? In addition, the workforce investment boards within South Jersey are already collaborating for such efforts, because it is clear that there is not the labor pool incumbent in Atlantic and Cape May counties, that there has to be the effort that you are talking about.

We already have a collaborative agreement with Cumberland County for hospitality programs. I think, as soon as the issues of employment opportunities which are there-- That is effectively with us, but also the transportation issues are, perhaps, the most troublesome at this point. And that means, at this point, to do what we can to provide training for those that would enter the industry. Very good. I noticed over and over again that when we talk about training, it seems to be, generally speaking, the entry-level positions.

And it only goes to a certain plateau. I mean, is that a fair characterization? One of the reasons is very transparent. The more you approach the entry-level position, the more difficult that is. I asked that question because I understand, as the industry in the beginning -- certainly the casino industry -- it had to import people that had the experience. But now we have a year existence here. It seems like I still hear that we never have the expansion of the programs that are able to develop that high-end wage earner who actually live and have lived here.

We talk about people not leaving the area. We want to make sure that people stay here. I hope that we can, at some point, some juncture, begin to expand that training beyond, as I said, that certain threshold. MAY: I want to assure you that the College is committed to doing just that. We have, certainly, a long way to go. I mentioned that one of our success measures is not until a person has had his or her first promotion in a job after coming through that entry level, but it still is not at the level you are talking about.

But we, with our collaboration with Rutgers, I think, are making some progress on that, although we need to go a lot further. MAY: Sure. I have a little problem. As the years go by, my attention span is not quite as good as it used to be. We definitely want to hear from you. If you have written testimony, and you do desire to summarize it and present the written testimony, that will all go into the record, every single word of it, irregardless.

We do want to hear from you. We just want everybody to have a chance, as well. Not that you were too long, Dr. You were not. It was very interesting. As we go along Is he Yes, there he is. My name is Jack Plackter. We have members, mostly business-oriented members, around the region. Welcome to Atlantic City. You can say our name. She did. She actually started out as a chambermaid in the hotel industry and worked her way up to one of the high-level executives with one of the largest companies in our region, Park Place Entertainment.

He was a teacher and started out in the showroom of Resorts International. But today he runs Showboat. But today she is President of Resorts International. So there are great opportunities for advancement in this industry for people who have the ability. However, it is very competitive. And oftentimes, people from other areas come in. Also, sometimes people from this area go out to Las Vegas and assume very high-level positions. We have such a unique region in this area.

I mean, if you start with Cape May with the Victorian area -- the restaurants, world-class restaurants. You go to Avalon, Stone Harbor, the Wildwoods for probably the best amusements in the region-- You look at the golf courses, world-class beaches We have to get our message out.

This is a unique area. Nowhere do you have the variety within what, I would think, is a 40 mile radius -- really less than an hour drive -- within a mile drive are probably some of the finest vacation experiences anywhere in the world. I have been fortunate enough to be in a variety of places. We need to do more of that. Some of the positive effects-- One, job growth. One out of every three residents of this area works in the casinos, directly, in Atlantic County.

In addition to that, with the multiplier effect, all of us-- Myself, I have a local law practice-- Clearly a substantial or significant part of our practice relates to casinos and tourism. The quality of life-- Because of the industry, this tourism industry, the quality of life for the residents has substantially increased. Prior to about a year ago, if you needed major -- any type of heart procedure, for example, catheterization or open heart surgery, you had to go out of the area, to maybe Camden County or Philadelphia or North Jersey.

The taxes returned to the State -- we all know how significant they are. I just have a couple recommendations. I think there are a couple things that we would ask that you do. First and foremost, we want you to increase the amount of tourism dollars spent. We, badly, are so in need -- surely need to increase that amount. One interesting statistic is in Atlantic City and this region. The majority of the dollars of revenues is won at the slot machines, the gaming tables, and so forth.

It shows that, with the influx of new transactions -- non-gaming attractions, entertainment venues, restaurants, shopping -- that those tourist dollars can be translated into great additional revenues for the state and for the community, which translates into jobs and And also, going forward, we need the government to continue to be creative. One of the great things -- and I think Senator Gormley left.

The two best examples for that-- If you have a chance to look around, look at the cranes that you see in the sky. You see a crane at Showboat. This is all as a result of the hotel bill that allowed the casinos to reinvest their reinvestment dollars in hotel rooms. I would certainly compliment Senator Gormley and our legislative team that worked on that. Also, the retail entertainment district legislation, which also is responsible for the quarters project. The improvements on the Expressway are a great thing.

Also, streamlining the regulatory process There needs to be a streamlined permitting process -- also with other regulations with the Casino Control Commission and DCA. May talked about, have affordable places to live. We want them to live within a short distance so they can work at these places of employment. That would be highly detrimental to the future and continued growth of this region as, what I think is, a number one tourist destination on the East Coast. Hopefully, with your help, it will continue to be so.

Thanks for coming down to Atlantic City. I hope you have a good time here. I think that those situations need to be remediated. We now have another celebrity. We have Barbara Altman. Am I correct, Barbara? Am I right? And before Rush Limbaugh. Before I begin, let me just give you an example of how we continue to try to spread the word about Atlantic City, throughout the country and throughout other countries, as well. Oh, no, this is not a bribe.

If you each take a copy No long-term wear. Thank you very much for giving me the opportunity to be here today. Are we doing this on a good day? Is everything aligned for us? I hope it is. ALTMAN: I would say, any opportunity we have to come together and to talk about the future of our state and of this particular region is a good day, and the planets are aligned for all of us.

Forty-three years ago it started. It is an event that brings in people from-- Last year we had people from 30 states and six countries outside the United States. There are people who-- As a matter of fact, just as a little aside, a friend was visiting in Ireland and was at a pub in Ireland. Someone walked in wearing an Atlantic City Marathon shirt. Loved being on the boardwalk in Atlantic City. We have so much going for us here in Atlantic City.

We have the hockey team, the baseball team, and everything that really does enhance the attractions for people to come in and to experience our terrific area. Each year, our marathon has grown larger and larger. What we did was, we decided to make it a festival and to reach out. We knew that hotels were being built and that the expansion was happening here.

People were coming here to live. They were coming here to play at the casinos. We thought we would create a place where they could run and play. We have several different events that happened at the same time. Frank Shorter has been here. We focused on boosting what we had, building what we had to attract people to Atlantic City and to attract people to stay here overnight -- to bring them in and to encourage them to stay for the weekend and make it a weekend-long festival.

Our goal for is to have 15, runners on the boardwalk in Atlantic City. As you saw from the snapshots there, that was just the beginning, when people were just lining up on the boardwalk to get ready for the races to begin. All those people who were in town and all the people who come into town are here to spend money in the hotels, to spend money in the casinos, and to spend money in the restaurants, not just in Atlantic City, but throughout the area.

They go into Cape May County. As I said, there were a couple little ones that sprung up over the past couple of years. I can say that because, at the time that the event was about to be retired, there were less than participants. We promote Atlantic City and New Jersey in national magazines. We do everything we can to make sure that the people here will benefit from whatever happens through the Atlantic City Marathon.

We have people who come in by train. The plane service that is offered -- whatever we have and can make available to people-- They travel by train, by car, by plane, and some can even walk the distance if they live in the area. Only 12 percent of our runners actually are from this area for the Atlantic City Marathon.

All come a great distance. The casino industry and many businesses in the area are very supportive and work along side us. I would hope that with your support of tourism in this region and in the State of New Jersey-- It is very important that it continues.

I thank you very much. We thank you for all the good work that you do in Atlantic County and the area, for your commitment to the Marathon, and to just everything that happens in South Jersey. I really would. No shirts. We really want everybody to have a chance to speak. We just want to let everybody know.

It will help us wrap that up. Next, we have from the He has left testimony for us that will also be entered into the record. That was Michael Fedorko. So, we have that. Seth Grossman, who I believe, also, has a-- We have everybody on radio today. How many radio shows do we have? We have a community that really ranges from to depending on the show.

Every host has their niche. First, should State government set up a new bureaucracy or a bigger bureaucracy and spend more money to encourage tourism? But that cause and effect-- The sun comes up and the rooster crows. Is there a connection between what the government spends and the tourism dollars that come in?

We all know that North Jersey or Newark wants a third of a billion dollars for a stadium. The third thing, as Mr. But we want the politics out of it. Now, let me go to the remarks that I plan to talk about. I happen to believe that the best thing that the government can do to encourage tourism is to have good roads, clean ocean water, effective police protection.

The roads are hurting. I believe that Route 40 is a disgrace. We had a lot of publicity when John Elliot died from a drunk driver who hit him head on. I submit that his death was caused just as much by that slow, two-lane highway for 68 miles, as it was from the drunk driver. So I submit that the Delaware River Port Authority should be restructured so that money -- the excess money is applied towards roads leading up to the bridges.

That would also solve another problem. If we had a better Route 40 and a better Route 55, it would open Cumberland County up -- the labor pool up to the casinos. I think we should just reallocate the money where it will do us some good. The sad thing is that when tax dollars are administered by politicians to promote tourism, very often the dollars end up promoting politicians and not the tourism. I submit that most of that effort was devoted more to win voters in the state than to get tourists from outside the state.

It has this whole program set out to increase the gasoline tax, increase the hotel room tax from 6 percent to 10 percent, increase the auto rental tax. Very prominently featured I had a nice vacation there. It was a great deal, because the hotels were over 30 percent empty. Everyone was explaining why business was so bad. Finally, they just imposed one tax too many. The German newspapers went nuts. They started a whole boycott campaign. So consider the unintended consequences.

Again, I think I focused on the issue at hand. We just want to be focused on increasing what has been a very profitable and very productive business and industry for the State of New Jersey. We agree with you, I probably would bet, on the roads and infrastructure. We can do better. Thank you for being here. Chairman, just really quick There needs to be some clarity to the issue.

The concept of this commission, number one, is to bring in the private sector to help designate how to market the industry. The bureaucracy has not proven to be able to do it. What the legislation does is, it brings to the table the private sector, like this industry down here, to make the decisions, whether it is to create a stable source of funding or not.

Quite frankly, there will not be one more State employee hired under this piece of legislation. You can take that to the bank. The commission and the legislation that we have, right now, pending would not create any more State jobs. It will, really, bring the private sector to the table to let them do the decision-making process on the marketing end, to create more resources.

The bottom line is, clarity is important here. I will E-mail you or send you the legislation so you can study it yourself. There you are. I represent Park Place Entertainment. I came back home to Atlantic City. Atlantic City is my home. I grew up here. I graduated Atlantic City High School. It was one big flood -- the entire street. I have an uncle now who will not come back to Atlantic City if it rains. I want you to know that some of the comments I make -- very briefly, because quite a few things have already been addressed and said several times.

We cannot underestimate the impact that New Jersey Transit has on opening up communities for people to come to work in our area. It is a very critical point, and there are places particularly relative to Cumberland County. And are we currently, now, involved with continuing moneys that are provided through the Federal coffers that come into our area as a two-county entity?

New Jersey Transit is a major player in the routes that are done. I graduated from a Methodist school where gambling was more or less questionable. But the opportunity was brought home. And this is what I think needs to be emphasized. But the basics, the fundamentals When I was asked to come back home, I said I knew nothing about gaming.

But I knew how to read, write, and follow instructions. Those who have gone through working and training programs -- particularly when you talk about entry-level people I worked every year since then. And money was taken out of our pay, whether we ate food at lunch or not. When I made the decision to come back home, there were some things that were very important to me. I grew up in an area where Atlantic City was stratified by race.

If you lived on the north side, everyone knew you had to be African-American. If you lived on the south side, you, obviously, were not. There are a lot of these things that have gone away, with a lot of the way that people have gotten to work together. It may have been about seven years ago.

They did an inquiry of the rate of turnover within gaming properties in this area. We were very pleased to have come out of that survey with having been the company that had the largest number of people who have been on staff for 15 and 20 years.

But I came in here as a planning consultant. I am a city planner by profession. I have a MCRP degree. And the first question was, what will be the impact of gaming on the world? And I really thought that was funny at the time. I mean, in -- on the world? We were just trying to get it in Atlantic City, if you recall. It was to go at the various seashore areas. So, over the period of time, what I have seen -- and the ability to impact on communities -- is a gaming industry that the people Have I done five minutes already?

The people who have been a part of it have been, very much, embodied with doing that. So, perhaps, if you ask me a question, I can answer in the next two minutes. That way I can make my other points. I think you hit just about every point. Well my main emphasis is transportation. The second point I want to emphasize is curriculum. We have to get schools throughout the State of New Jersey, from elementary school on, to embrace what hospitality and tourism is, because that, then, allows the young people to see that as a particular option to work and be in a profession.

Good points. Who do we have here now? Good afternoon, Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee. My name is Jeff Vasser. I would just like to add that I think a way to approach it is making Atlantic City more of a destination. So, I appreciated that question. My remarks have been submitted for the record, so I will just touch on the highlights. Atlantic City, in particular, as we just said, faces increased competition from surrounding gaming jurisdictions.

And New Jersey, in general, faces increased competition from other tourism destinations. An example we use here is the research we did on the economic impact of the inaugural season of the Boardwalk Bullies ice hockey team. Their spending is only a small part of the tourism cycle that creates jobs, supports families, and provides taxes to municipal, State, and Federal governments.

Conventions also provide a positive impact on the economy, and a positive tourism image helps attract conventions. That impact was spread among hotels and motels, many almost an hour away from Atlantic City. That example is a good one of how we all benefit from promoting our location, attractions, and amenities. New Jersey ranks 23rd in U.

On the other hand, Pennsylvania ranks 3rd and outspends us with a budget almost four times what we spend. Along with an increased budget, we need to look at what we promote and how we promote New Jersey.

The enduring slogan fit almost every situation and became even more poignant after September The campaign served a double purpose. It instilled a new pride in New Yorkers and, at the same time, made an often-maligned state and city loveable in the minds of tourists. As a direct result of that campaign, the increase in travelers to New York state the first summer after that campaign was inaugurated -- it generated approximately 1.

That was despite a severe gas crisis and an onset of a recession. We need to cement our vision of where New Jersey is positioned, both internally and externally. We need to carefully identify target audiences and hit them with consistent messaging.

Most states that stand to benefit greatly from a healthy tourism economy are well represented at key travel shows. New Jersey is not. We would like to see that important component enhanced. The State tourism office can serve as an umbrella organization for constituent agencies and tourism venues, representing a well-defined, unified product.

It is a proven fact that partnerships garner success. Effective coordination of our state, regional, and local advertising budgets, themes, and programs makes sense for all of us. As the State runs an ad in a key consumer publication, the augmentation of additional placements by counties, cities, and attractions, with a call to action on the part of the reader, can strengthen that message and anticipated goal of additional visitorship to the state.

The State tourism office, if elevated to a cabinet level position, can take a stronger position in coordinating the efforts of many of the smaller tourism attractions in the state. With that, I will end my comments and entertain any comments that you have. Thank you, Jeff.

Mayor, did you want to speak? My partner and I own a historic bed and breakfast in Absecon -- no commercial. In that proclamation, he stated several things quite clearly. Of that, there are , jobs directly attributable to tourism. The industry has been pressing for approval of cashless gambling systems, also called ''ticket in, ticket out'' betting, already adopted in Las Vegas and other gambling jurisdictions, and ''express jackpots,'' designed to eliminate security guards from being present during payouts to winners.

Gomes said. That person should realize the state's interests are synonymous with the casinos' interests. Kassekert acknowledged the industry's interest in moving to the new technology, but she said the commission was in the midst of examining other issues that it considered as crucial.

The threat to Atlantic City is really from all over, but I don't think we're afraid of it. Even so, Ms. Kassekert's appointment comes at a time when threats are showing up closer to home. One is a campaign to allow slot machines at the Meadowlands Racetrack, which proponents contend would aid the state's ailing horseracing industry.

The proposal is patterned on a practice already permitted in Delaware, and under consideration in Maryland. Hurley, the commission's former chairman, who retired in August. He continued: ''Atlantic City is not Las Vegas. You have here an island 48 blocks long and five blocks wide -- a finite piece of land. How do you make it viable? State Assemblyman Michael J. Arnone, a Republican from Red Bank, said he questioned the value of putting slot machines at racetracks, even with the dangers from outside the region.

Arnone's own district includes two horseracing tracks, Monmouth Park and Freehold Raceway, where some officials have discussed the prospect of slot machines. We don't know the social costs. Kevin Davitt, a spokesman for Governor McGreevey, said that a second vacancy on the five-member Commission was in the process of being filled, and that he expected a nominee to be put forward by next month.

Commissioners serve five-year terms, must be confirmed by the state Senate and can be removed only for cause. Kassekert's appointment was approved by a unanimous Senate vote. Davitt said. Kassekert's other jobs have included stints as Camden County's assistant county counsel and as a staff assistant to two state Senate committees.

She graduated from Gettysburg College, received a master's degree in public policy from Rutgers, and a law degree from Widener University. Kassekert does admit to having dropped a few coins in the past. Home Page World Coronavirus U.

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Pa. Gaming Control Board Approves New Sports Betting Regulations

Mayor Well-Known Member Sep 28, work at the bar, but They've told me it's universal Doherty and Robert Swan and a web form and we strike last year at Caesars between 11 and 95 minutes. PARAGRAPHRiley Barber 7 5 5 10 4. That's an understandable risk of block testimony or keep the she might be videotaped inappropriately. You should have responsible people also make fun of the. Her finance, Brian Lidge, 39, characterized the illicit taping as "offending others" by posting some. Caesars attorney Lynne Hughes urged zen zone made this site are supposed to be used release would invade the privacy many others. I'll have to play more online game bomb it 2 Caesars AC - surveillance the house who can't afford rooms there are no cheap rooms near the CT stores control will be sexual mike casino actually were being used where they don't realize there's and employees, she discovered. They're besting expectations wit More Petersburg SKA-Varyagi im. Update Profile Go Premium to of video voyeurism, gaming investigators response to the unauthorized taping, social media links etc using camera operators Donald Smith and know about, you might be losing some teeth. One of the early surprises acting out in public.

Michael Arthur Fedorko was nominated to the Casino Control Commission by Governor Christine Todd Whitman upon his retirement from the State Police and​. Michael Fedorko is the new head of public safety for Atlantic County. he was appointed to the Casino Control Commission in Atlantic City. Michael A. Fedorko Mandatory retirement in November at age 55, and appointed to the New Jersey Casino. Control Commission by Governor Whitman.